How My Body Talks To Me

Since I started on the Paleo/supplement route, I’ve been noticing my body’s responses more, and I’ve realised that it communicates with me in some very clear ways:

  • Hair and nails dry and brittle – need more coconut oil or coconut milk in my diet
  • Hay-fever like symptoms – too much lactose in my diet (or sometimes hayfever)
  • Hungry – need to eat more protein
  • Exhausted, feeling generally deprived and miserable – need to eat more healthy fats
  • Cramp in legs or feet (especially when doing yoga) – need more salt in my diet
  • Serious pain in digestive system – I’ve eaten more than a teaspoon of any kind of grain
  • Weight gain – too much stress/not enough sleep
  • Mouth ulcers – too much stress/not enough sleep
  • Painful joints – not enough salmon (or mackerel, depending on bank balance)
  • Feeling down – need more very dark chocolate
  • Headache/migraine – I’ve eaten too much very dark chocolate (it’s a fine balance which falls somewhere between 100g and 150g of 85% Green and Black’s per day)
  • Achy muscles – need more yoga
  • Feeling twitchy – need a walk in the fresh air
  • Feeling anxious, having brain fog, inability to finish a sentence or a hot cup of tea – I have three children:-)
Advertisements

Nearly Paleo Brunch

You see, I wrote this blog post once already and the recipe was so good, WordPress ate it. Sadly, I’ve now forgotten most of what I said…

This is what we had yesterday, for the meal that happens at around 3pm on a Sunday when you’ve been rushing around and realise you haven’t actually had any food since breakfast. We have it often, with different ingredients depending on what’s in the fridge, but this particular combination was so good The Husband wanted me to save the recipe. So I thought my blog was a good place to store it.

Note – this recipe serves four lightweights, three normal people, or two people who are really hungry. It’s not entirely 100% Paleo, and it’s definitely not Kosher. However, if you wanted to sacrifice the Paleo side, you could probably make it with Viennas… or if you’re feeling very adventurous, vouscht (I’ve never ever seen the ingredients on any pack of vouscht or Viennas, but I really doubt they’re gluten free. They are however, very definitely dairy free:-)

Ingredients:

  • Sausages. We used Sainsburys 97% Outdoor Reared sausages. Not strictly Paleo but we figure that if there’s 97% happy pig pork, there’s only 3% for the anti-Paleo ingredients. We typically use 12 chipolatas, or six normal sausages. Around 375/400g per packet anyway
  • Onions – one
  • Courgette – one
  • Mushrooms – six large
  • Sweet Pepper – one
  • Olive Oil – one tablespoon
  • Tomato Puree – one tablespoon
  • Stock Cube – one. We make our own stock cubes, by making stock out of a chicken carcass and various vegetables, then reducing the liquid down loads and freezing it in ice cube trays. I suppose you could use a Paleo friendly stock cube dissolved in a tablespoon or so of water

Method – 1:

  1. Fry over the sausages in the olive oil until they’re just brown
  2. While they are frying, chop the pepper, onion, mushrooms and courgette but keep them separate
  3. Cut them up into three or four pieces per sausage depending on how much patience you have
  4. Add the onions and courgettes, and fry until the onion starts to go translucent
  5. Add the mushrooms, pepper, stock cube and tomato puree
  6. Mix well and keep frying until the sausages are cooked through
  7. Eat

Method – 2:

  1. Chop all the solid ingredients and fry in the olive oil, tomato puree and stock cube until the sausages are cooked through

***

Which method you use should depend on how hungry you are. This is not a souffle recipe – if you change the ingredients, amounts, or cooking time it doesn’t matter in the slightest:-) I am keen to hear however from fellow Jewish Paleo lifestyle followers (there has to be a better way to phrase that!), from anyone who dares to try the above with vouscht or Viennas, or from anyone with a loved variation of the recipe…

 

Lard and the Lack of Logic

Please note – the blog post below reflects my own personal opinions, beliefs and experiences. It is not intended to offend, or to disrespect anyone else’s beliefs, opinions or practices.

***

I am a Reform Jew. I was born into a Liberal Jewish family. In the UK, these are fairly similar, to the extent that they share a Rabbinical college, and whichever you are is usually determined by which type of Synagogue is closest. In London, it was a Liberal Shul, in South Wales where we live now, it’s a Reform Shul. Because I had a split family, London and South Wales, I actually had my Bat Mitzvah celebrated twice – once in a Liberal Shul and once in a Reform Shul.

This is only really relevant because we don’t keep Kosher. My family have never kept Kosher, and now, living in South Wales, married to a Pagan, I don’t feel any need to keep Kosher. I believe that the Kosher laws were very sensible in their day, ensuring that animals were treated with respect, and that foods that could easily spoil in hot weather were taboo. In this day and age, I feel it’s more important to eat free range or organic food.

I still have residual guilt about my non-Kosher status, plus a load of cultural influences cascading through the family from my grandparents and their grandparents – so that even though I’m quite happy to eat sausages and bacon, I don’t like roast pork or pork chops, and I would never have so much as considered using lard for cooking.

However, eating a truly Paleo diet is rather expensive, and slightly beyond our budget at the moment, so we’re having to make a few compromises. A lot of the recipes we’re following use coconut oil, which is ferociously expensive. Great for Paleo cakes and sweet (ish) treats, but not necessary for savoury dishes. So far we’ve used olive oil as a substitute where possible, but that doesn’t react well to high heat, so last week I bought some lard. Just a plain ordinary block of lard in a packet.

We’ve had quite a few fry ups, and I’m astonished to say they tasted great. We also had fried mushrooms – my current craving is for fried mushrooms, so I expect I’ll find a reason why I shouldn’t eat them fairly soon – and they were also lovely. I am rather surprised at the lack of, well, porky, bacony flavour. And even more surprised that I don’t have retributory feelings of nausea or a lightening bolt style poorly tummy.

And yet – I still don’t feel comfortable. There is no logic to this whatsoever. I will not stop eating bacon or pork sausages, ham, or salami. So in future, when we’re feeling flush I’ll go with coconut oil or possibly goose fat, and olive oil when times are tight. I’ll try to get some suet and experiment with that. But, as it turns out, lard is just one step too far.

Today I tackled Butternut Squash

I found one in Aldi last Sunday, and all week I’ve been looking at it in the fridge and thinking ‘I’ll deal with it later’. I’ve never had it before, but I’ve had some horrible experiences with marrow, and some disappointing experiments with pumpkin, so I was not looking forward to attempting to get something edible out of this weird-shaped beige object.

But this evening I decided the time had come. I looked up some recipes and was horrified to find out that you can cook it as a sweet or savoury dish – can it not make its mind up?? Is it a vegetable or a dessert? I decided to go for a savoury recipe, on the basis that frying almost anything over with salt, ground pepper and garlic can’t go that badly wrong.

First, says the recipe, peel and chop the squash. Now I understand why Paleo type diets cause weight loss and improved muscle definition – you build up the muscles from sawing your way through rock solid vegetables, and you lose weight because by the time you’ve peeled and chopped said vegetables, a) your appetite has disappeared and b) you don’t have time to eat much at all. Once I managed to saw my way into the squash, I found it had seeds a bit like a melon, which I should have known but for a second was a very nasty shock. Then, I found that the flesh of the vegetable is bright, TOWIE orange – no offence intended to the good people of that series, but that really, truly is the colour.

I meant to fry it over in goose fat, which I found at our local Spar (no, really, local Spar. It’s in Usk, and contains a bizarre but fascinating and useful mix of bog-standard single brand cornershop goods, and artisan foods that I’ve only heard of from Nigella’s books). Sadly, I completely forgot, and ended up frying it over in olive oil. I also completely forgot the garlic. It’s been a long half term holiday.

So after about half an hour of waiting for it to go brown as per the recipe (it didn’t),we ended up with ordinary sauteed butternut squash. And the verdict is:

It was quite nice. I liked it enough to eat all of mine, and The Husband liked his too (he said in a surprised voice). It has a solid texture, and a sweetish flavour a bit like sweet potato, but not quite as dense. I’m not sure how often we’ll cook it, but I think after sauteeing, it would make a nice addition to stew or casserole, especially as a more Paleo substitute for potatoes.

So we’re adding butternut squash to fennel on our list of ‘Who knew?’ vegetables. My next big adventure on the Paleo journey may end up being home made chicken liver pate. Then again, with our current track record at the shopping, it may have to wait until all the children have left home…

The Paleo Adventure

Over the years, for health and weight reasons I’ve tried almost every diet there is, except the Cabbage Soup Diet, and for some reason that escapes me, Slimming World, although I know people who’ve had great results with Slimming World.

My holy grail of the eating plan is the one where I can eat healthy food so I feel virtuous, never feel hungry or deprived, and still lose weight until I’m at the same weight I was at 16 and then maintain it, again without feeling hungry or deprived. A plan that fits with my chaotic, disorganised lifestyle and will do so for the rest of my life without me getting bored and binging on the bad stuff. So far, strangely, that magical diet, and let’s face it, it would have to be Harry Potter/Gandalf levels of magic, has eluded me.

However, I’m always a sucker for a new idea and a success story, so for many reasons, I’ve decided to start following a Paleo-based diet, as described beautifully by the people at Mark’s Daily Apple and PaleoPlan.com. I’ve subscribed to the menu service from PaleoPlan, which provides a complete menu plan (three meals a day plus a snack), plus complete shopping list, every week, for a very reasonable price. Frankly, it was the realisation that it will cost me substantially less than my Netflix subscription that persuaded me to give it a go. That and the lack of having to make the decisions that lead me to freeze in panic whenever I have to do a food shop.

I’m now a week and half in, and so far I’ve lost half a stone, eaten a huge amount of very lovely food, rediscovered my love of cooking and baking, and my colitis symptoms have not gone, but noticeably eased off. So far, so good. I say this now because I am impressed, I am grateful to the people at PaleoPlan for the hard work they put in, and I will stick to it (I’m just eating a Paleo friendly, low sugar vanilla loaf and it’s gorgeous). But it hasn’t been an easy path so far…

Ingredients:

  • Lots and lots of organic vegetables, some of them rather obscure, some of them straight from dinner parties of the late eighties/early nineties (haven’t seen sun-dried tomatoes yet though)
  • Lots of organic fruit, mostly berries
  • Lots of organic meat, some of which is impossible to get at Asda. Or Sainsburys. Or without taking out a second mortgage
  • A coconut plantation. Seriously, most of the recipes involve coconut oil, coconut flour, coconut milk, coconut cream or dessicated coconut
  • Some willpower, although given the large variety of delicious cakes I can now make that are entirely Paleo, and the fact that Green and Black’s 85% chocolate appears to be fairly Paleo from the wrapper, not as much willpower as you’d imagine.
  • The ability to use every bowl and utensil in the kitchen while cooking (people say that about men, but I’m far worse than The Husband)

Method

  1. (Tuesday) Receive shopping list. Attempt to buy ingredients online at Asda. Manage to get about 2/3 of the ingredients.
  2. Find an online supplier of coconut and all associated products (healthysupplies.co.uk, very fast delivery, quite good value for money, certainly compared to Waitrose).
  3. (Sunday) Realise I still haven’t got some of the ingredients and I’m supposed to start the plan today. Rush around Sainsburys in a panic. Can’t find chicken wings, can’t find canned pumpkin, can’t find fresh pumpkin. Decide to substitute bramley apples instead (for the pumpkin, not the chicken wings).
  4. During the course of the week, realise I have somehow got confused, and bought 24 pork chops. Also realise that no matter how beautifully cooked they are, I don’t like pork chops. Luckily, The Husband and all three children do like pork chops.
  5. Realise that all of the recipes are in cups. I have no idea what a cup converts to in UK measurements. Assume a cup is 4 oz of dry goods or 4 tablespoons liquid. Do all cooking on this basis – get some rather odd results, but nothing inedible. A week and a half later, find a measuring jug with cups down the side. Suddenly understand odd results, cooking and baking now much more successful.
  6. Attempt to stick exactly to meal plan lasts 1 day, after which meal plan is determined by what is going out of date next. Just like life before Paleo, but with healthier and more delicious ingredients.

Next week, I’m planning to try some of the cake recipes using lard or beef dripping instead of coconut oil, which is ferociously expensive. I’m not planning to tell the rest of the family though, at least not until after they’ve tasted it…

Emergency Desserts

Mayim Bialik, one of my heroines, Jewish Neuroscientist and Actress, has posted up to an application I’ve never heard of (snapp? I feel old) an easy and relatively quick to make dessert:

http://app.snapapp.com/MothersDayRecipeDownload

that is taken from her new vegan cookbook which I am saving up for. Even though I will probably never cook a vegan recipe. Although if I had the book I might…

However, this did get me thinking about emergency desserts. There are times in everyone’s life where nothing but a dessert will lift the spirits, and often, those are the times when energy levels are low and life is, frankly, disorganised. Mayim’s dessert looks easy and delicious, but you have to wait two whole hours for it to set in the fridge! Also, I’m not sure how often I’ll have peanut butter and coconut milk in my cupboard at the same time as I’m having a crisis, and popping into the local village shop is not likely to help. However, in our family we do have a couple of desserts that are suitable for dire emergencies, and require very little planning or preparation.

I think this is my favourite for speed, likelihood of having the ingredients in my house, ease of getting them in the local shop/garage if I haven’t, and general feeling of wellbeing after consumption. I also want to mention that although I have not intentionally copied this recipes out of any cookery books, and as far as I’m aware I completely made it up, it’s possible that it was once invented by someone else – in which case I apologise.

Chocolate Cream
Note – if you use very dark chocolate, which has low sugar levels, and since they’ve decided that saturated fat is no longer bad for us, this is a pretty virtuous dessert. It is however, extremely rich – use with caution.

Ingredients: Dark chocolate, clotted cream. Or double cream. Or single cream. (I’ve tried it with marscapone cheese – that really was an emergency – and it was a disaster, feel free to try it if you want to take the risk, but I won’t join you).

Method: melt the chocolate in the microwave, or in a bowl over a pan of simmering water (the microwave is quicker). 10-15 seconds at a time, and then stir and then wait a minute if you’re using the microwave – that way you won’t burn it.

When the chocolate is all liquid, or when it’s mostly liquid with some lumps in it, depending on how desperate you’re feeling, stir it into the clotted cream. Or double cream. Or single cream.

Put into the fridge until set. Or just wait until the mixture’s cooled down enough to not burn your mouth.

Eat.

Feel better.